This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Posted by: internationalroutier | March 20, 2012

Invasion of Newcastle- now with added words!

Didn’t we have a lovely day…
The day dawned much clearer than the previous Invasion. We made our way in a leisurely fashion to Hornsby station and hooked up with Blue Sue and Spike, the Reverend and Mrs the Reverend. Spike had obtained some artery hardening second breakfast in the form of hot chips, with barely-less-than-solid fat. This was duly passed around.

Imagine our horror when it became known that Helmut the German, that Invasion Stalwart, was not joining us this time! No Special Coffee or physically impossible amounts of Middle Eastern Pastries!!! Fortunately the president had rallied and done her best to make “yuppy coffee” despite Spike’s intervention, and did a pretty phenomenal job at the near impossible task of living up to Helmut.


The dear feller’s company sadly missed, we set about playing a game of debate – one of Spike’s card games (photos of which you will see below). This seemed to me to go on all the way to Newcastle!



However, at Gosford we were met by Lee, who had sacrificed his morning in bed to head south and accompany us back to his home town. At this point we played the game at which we are now so expert…juggling hot cups of “coffee” , thermoses, pastries, cakes and fruit.


Upon arrival at Newcastle we sauntered over to the Wharf and met Buffalo Bill, his missus and their various progeny. Magnus set to with a 3D game of Angry Birds with young Evan and apart from eating and wearing vast amounts of tomato sauce with some fish and chips, nothing much else happened down the kids end of the table.

At the river end of the table, we drank pint after pint of ginger beer (which was back on tap – hooray – though there seemed to be a pint glass shortage) until we were deemed liquid enough to have a meeting, which we did, and there was much rejoicing – especially when it was finished.


Delicious meals were had and more chitter chat until it seemed that the 3 o-clock entertainment was setting up. The marvellous Mr Dixon joined us at this point.


Too soon it was time to head home. The Cessnockians left and we headed for the train with Puppy. A fun trip back south, though unfortunately someone didn’t sleep as hoped (but his father did). Rail-weary and battered and bruised (the scars of child-minding) I returned home and neglected for weeks to write this promised account.

A successful trip! Absent friends toasted, new friends welcomed, traditions upheld. A wise new committee evidently agrees that once a year is not enough for this type of event. I look forward to the Inaugural Invasion of Wollongong coming up in August and suggest in the meantime a Waistcoat Outing to Woy Woy via train, for fish and chips and duck feeding.
Vixen

from the ed
Three cheers for all guest posters!!
Stay tuned for our first bloggy giveaway!!!

Posted by: internationalroutier | March 12, 2012

An Invasion of Newcastle (in pics, so far)

Posted by: Leatherworking Reverend | March 11, 2012

Protected: Soldiers’ Council, February 2012 Newcastle-upon-Hunter

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Posted by: Leatherworking Reverend | March 1, 2012

Games boxes

Now you have all your new-found board game skills worked out, what do you do with them? Get one of these to play on, obviously.

There’s chess on the B side and backgammon inside. Here’s another example.

And there are entire sites devoted to them. Obviously the flash sets are for the nobs, but let’s have another, closer look at the one the soldiers were playing draughts on from the post a few back. You can plainly see the division between the two layers of the board and the two catches holding them closed.

Game of Draughts - detail

So there were plainer ones around for the plebs, just very few of them make it in to the history books or on display in museums. There’s an earlier backgammon board from the Mary Rose (1545) made in a similar way but without the B-sides for the other games, the two leaves of the board look like they have been made by different people and really obviously don’t match. The quality of the work is similar to the one in the painting. The other remarkable thing is that the veneer, particularly on the German ones, is as thin as modern knife-cut veneer, not medieval sawn veneer. You can see it in the corners where it’s lifting.

Often they were carried in a cloth or leather bag to protect them. The Mary Rose one had traces of red cloth on the outside, and there’s a couple of inventories from the 16th century specifying white leather bags.

So now there’s no excuse not to get a board or two. I’m going to have a crack at making one and might let you know how I go.

Posted by: Leatherworking Reverend | February 26, 2012

Tinder for a tinderbox

Time for another mea culpa. I had been of the understanding that the use of char-cloth for fire lighting was introduced slightly before the American Civil War. I’ve just discovered I was wrong after reading a quote in the latest Mary Rose book (Vol 3, Weapons of Warre) I’ll give the full quote because it also describes the method for preparing normal tinder and the tinder box.

Take those great things which are called olde Todestooles growing out of the bottomes of nuttrees, beechtrees, okes, and such like trees, drye them with the smoke of fire, & then cut them into as many peeces as you will, and hauing well beaten them, boyle the  in strong lie with waule floure, or saltpeeter, till all the lie shal be consumend. After this laying them in a heape uppon a boorde, drie them in an oven which must not be made verie hotte, and after you haue so done, beate them well with a wooden mallet, and when you shall haue cause to use any parte of those Todestooles (now by the means above declared made touchwood) rubbe well that parte betweene your handes for to make it softe and apte to take fire. But when you will make tinder for a Gunners tinder boxe, take peeces of fustian, or of old and fine linnen clothe, make them to burn and flame in a fire, & suddenly before the flame which is in the  doth die, choke the fire, & keepe their tinder so made in a boxe lined within with clothe, to the ende that it may not be moyste at any time.

Appendix 20-1,  Lucar, C., Translation of Tartaglia, Three Bookes of Colloquies Concerning the Arte of Shooting in Great and Samll Peeces of Artillerie with Appendix, London,1588

Posted by: Leatherworking Reverend | February 16, 2012

Games – Morris

Copy of a Mary Rose arrow chest, 1545, with a morris board carved in to the lid

Equipment

Nine Mens’ Morris or Mill is played on a board consisting of three concentric squares connected by lines from the middle of each of the inner square’s sides to the middle of the corresponding outer square’s side. Pieces are played on the corner points and on the points where lines intersect so there are 24 playable points. In this version of the game, there are nine black and nine white counters.

Preparation and Objective

To begin with the board is empty. The basic aim of the game is to make “mills” – vertical or horizontal lines of three in a row. Every time this is achieved, an opponent’s piece is removed, the overall objective being to reduce the number of opponent’s pieces to less than three or to render the opponent unable to play.

Basic Play

Players toss a coin or have a fistfight to decide who will play white – white moves first and has a slight advantage as a result. Play is in two phases. To begin with, players take turns to play a piece of their own colour on any unoccupied point until all eighteen pieces have been played. After that, play continues alternately but each turn consists of a player moving one piece along a line to an adjacent point.

Whenever a player achieves a mill, that player immediately removes from the board one piece belonging to the opponent that does not form part of a mill. If all the opponent’s pieces form mills then an exception is made and the player is allowed to remove any piece. It is only upon the formation of a mill that a piece is captured but a player will often break a mill by moving a piece out of it and then, in a subsequent turn, play the piece back again, thus forming a new mill and capturing another piece.

Captured pieces are never replayed onto the board and remain captured for the remainder of the game. The game is finished when a player loses either by being reduced to two pieces or by being unable to move.

Alternative board layouts have been used over the centuries. One common pattern adds four extra diagonal lines to the basic board outlined above, the lines being drawn from the corners of the inner square to the corners of the outer square. Pieces can be moved and mills made along these extra lines in the usual way.

Posted by: internationalroutier | February 10, 2012

Happy New Ordinance,

An Ordinance of the Committee of the Pike and Musket Society in Parliament, for the safety and defence of the Regiment

Whereas there hath been of late a most dangerous and desperate design upon the Regiment, which we have just cause to believe to be an effect of the bloody counsels of lay-abouts and other indolent persons,; and by reason of many discoveries we cannot but fear they will proceed not only to stir up the like sloth and idleness in the Regiment, but also to back them with forces from abroad.

For the safety therefore of the whole Body of Routiers in this time of imminent danger

The Committee appoints Andrew B of B___roke as Ensign, to carry the Dignity of the Routiers. And he shall have power to remove out of their places and make others from time to time as he thinks fit for that purpose.

And be it further ordained, that Gordon, Victoria, Stephen, Jackie shall be from time to time sequentially, randomly or otherwise called upon as Drummers, to rouse the Regiment to martial display and a semblance of in-time stepping.

Ross A, his appointment to the Office of Quartermaster is confirmed. Wayne R, his appointment as Public Officer is confirmed.

Wayne R and Ross A are also to retain their field duties as Corporals of Pike and Musket respectively. And they shall have power to remove out of their places and make others from time to time as they think fit for that purpose.

Louise L and Glenda R shall have such power and authority for Provender at camps and other events as is needful to ensure the most adequate and economical distribution of victuals to Routiers at certain times assembled and shall have the power to nominate and appoint such persons of quality as shall seem meet to them to assist.

The said persons, shall have power to lead, conduct and employ the persons aforesaid arrayed and weaponed, for the suppression of all rebellions, insurrections and invasions that may happen within the several and respective counties and places; according as they from time to time shall receive directions from the Committee assembled in Parliament.

Lastly, with regards to the most august position of Captayne, it is ordained by the Committee now in Parliament assembled, that Ross A of M___shire shall be designated Captayne of the Blacktown Medieval Fair, and Andrew B of B___roke shall be designated Captayne of the Wintercampe.

And to these purposes, they shall severally and respectively have power to assemble and call together all and singular Routiers, within the several and respective counties and places, as well within liberties as without, that are meet and fit for the wars, and them to train and exercise and put in readiness, and them after their abilities and faculties well and sufficiently from time to time to cause to be arrayed and weaponed, and to take the muster of them in places most fit for that purpose.

And it is further ordained, that such persons as shall not obey in any of the premises, shall answer their neglect and contempt in a Parliamentary way, and not otherwise nor elsewhere, and that every the powers granted as aforesaid shall continue until it shall be otherwise ordered or declared by both Houses of Parliament and no longer.

By the Authority of the Committee of the Pike and Musket Society,

Sue D, President. January 15. 2012.

The Divine Inspiration….

The Militia Ordinance.
[March 5, 1641/2. Journals of the House of Lords, iv. 587. See Hist. of Engl. x. 167, 171.[1]]
An Ordinance of the Lords and Commons in Parliament, for the safety and defence of the kingdom of England and dominion of Wales.
Whereas there hath been of late a most dangerous and desperate design upon the House of Commons, which we have just cause to believe to be an effect of the bloody counsels of Papists and other ill-affected persons, who have already raised a rebellion in the kingdom of Ireland; and by reason of many discoveries we cannot but fear they will proceed not only to stir up the like rebellion and insurrections in this kingdom of England, but also to back them with forces from abroad.
For the safety therefore of His Majesty’s person, the Parliament and kingdom in this time of imminent danger:
It is ordained by[2] the Lords and Commons now in Parliament assembled, that Henry Earl of Holland shall be Lieutenant of the County of Berks, Oliver Earl of Bolingbroke shall be Lieutenant of the County of Bedford, &c.
And shall severally and respectively have power to assemble and call together all and singular His Majesty’s subjects, within the said several and respective counties and places, as well within liberties as without, that are meet and fit for the wars, and them to train and exercise and put in readiness, and them after their abilities and faculties well and sufficiently from time to time to cause to be arrayed and weaponed, and to take the muster of them in places most[3] fit for that purpose; and the aforesaid Henry Earl of Holland, Oliver Earl of Bolingbroke, &c., shall severally and respectively have power within the several and respective counties and places aforesaid, to nominate and appoint such persons of quality as to them shall seem meet to be their Deputy Lieutenants, to be approved of by both Houses of Parliament:
And that any one or more of the said deputies so assigned and approved of in the absence or by the command of the said Henry Earl of Holland, Oliver Earl of Bolingbroke, &c., shall have power and authority to do and execute within the said several and respective counties and places to them assigned as aforesaid, all such powers and authorities before in this present Ordinance contained; and the aforesaid Henry Earl of Holland, Oliver Earl of Bolingbroke, &c., shall have power to make colonels, captains and other officers, and to remove out of their places, and make others from time to time, as they shall think fit for that purpose; and the said Henry Earl of Holland, Oliver Earl of Bolingbroke, &c., their deputy or deputies in their absence or by their command, shall have power to lead, conduct and employ the persons aforesaid arrayed and weaponed, for the suppression of all rebellions, insurrections and invasions that may happen within the several and respective counties and places; and shall have power and authority to lead, conduct and employ the persons aforesaid arrayed and weaponed, as well within their said several and respective counties and places, as within any other part of this realm of England or dominion of Wales, for the suppression of all rebellions, insurrections and invasions that may happen, according as they from time to time shall receive directions from[4] the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament.
And be it further ordained, that Sir John Gayre, Sir Jacob Garret, Knights, &c., citizens of London, or any six or more of them, shall have such power and authority within the City of London as any of the Lieutenants before named are authorised to have by this Ordinance, within the said several and respective counties (the nomination and appointment of Deputy Lieutenants only excepted). And it is further ordained, that such persons as shall not obey in any of the premises, shall answer their neglect and contempt to the Lords and Commons in a Parliamentary way, and not otherwise nor elsewhere, and that every the powers granted as aforesaid shall continue until it shall be otherwise ordered or declared by both Houses of Parliament and no longer.
[1] A very similar Ordinance was sent up to the Lords on Feb. 15 and accepted by them on the 16th (Journals of the House of Lords, iv. 587). It was sent to the King, and his answer having been voted to be a denial, the Lords returned the Ordinance to the Commons in a slightly altered form. It was finally adopted by both Houses on March 5.
[2] ‘by the King’s Most Excellent Majesty,’ is here inserted in the Ordinance of February 16.
[3] ‘most ‘ is omitted in the Ordinance of February 16.
[4] ‘by His Majesty’s authority, signified unto them by ‘ stands in the Ordinance of February 16 in the place of ‘ from.’

Posted by: Leatherworking Reverend | February 9, 2012

Protected: Committee Meeting Minutes, 29 December 2011

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Posted by: internationalroutier | February 8, 2012

Count me in!- trailer inventory bee

On a rare fine day of the summer, why don’t you…
1) Empty the trailer
2) Look at the stuff
3) Chuck some stuff, clean some stuff, fix some stuff, list some stuff we don’t have
4) Put it all back into the trailer

Tell me that doesn’t sound like a top day out!

Thank goodness our wise new president added a step 5) Lunch & Beers!


I think Ross has a mouthful of brown sauce at this point.

One of the main objectives of the day was to look at items we may have accrued over the years that are either no longer fit for purpose or that are not consistent with the latest in 17thC artefact research. Some things squeak above the yellow line by virtue of their handiness rather than their accuracy.

Exhibit #1
Very handy, not very period.

Some things are handy, but not period in their design and a more accurate version is desirable (and relatively easy).

Exhibit #2
Need to increase accuracy by replacing cork stoppers with wood.

Some things lose points (please note dear all on the interwebs, the word is ‘lose’ not ‘loose’) for design innacuracies but are saved by period construction materials and the ability to stack neatly in the trailer.

Exhibit #3
Anything that stacks is likely to stay.

Some things were just too grotty/non period or unnecessary to survive the day.
Exhibit #4
The naughty corner.

Some things defy description.
Exhibit #5
The very naughty corner, aka too hard basket.


If there are any coopers out there wanting a gig…

Great lists were listed, wishes wished and notes noted. Stay tuned to a Soldier’s Council meeting near you for full reports.


Please insert your own joke about having wood.

Older Posts »

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 31 other followers